Review: Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow by Gabrielle Zevin

Author: Gabrielle Zevin
Publisher: Knopf Publishing Group
Released: July 5, 2022
Received: Own (BOTM)
Warnings: Suicide, workplace shooting, childhood cancer

Wow. Wow! Suppose you have ever found yourself wanting to read a love letter to video game history merged with the intricacies of human nature. In that case, you must read Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow. Written by Gabrielle Zevin, this is not a book that pulls punches.

Sadie Green and Sam Masur have a very long and complex history. It’s hard to define their relationship. They seemed to be friends at times, such as when they were children. At other times it almost felt like they were advisories.

Individually they are both extremely intelligent and creative. But together? Together they can create fantastic worlds. Worlds that fans will stand in line to buy, waiting on that next memorable experience.

“And what is love, in the end?” Alabaster said. “Except the irrational desire to put evolutionary competitiveness aside in order to ease someone else’s journey through life?”

Words cannot describe how deeply Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow hit me. This novel is everything, and even then, that feels too bland of a statement. You must read this novel if you love video games (and their history), character-driven plots, and deeply emotional plots.

What really hit me is how complex Sadie and Sam’s relationship is. Thanks to the description, I knew it wouldn’t be smooth sailing. But as with many things in life, that description didn’t even scratch the surface. It was the tip of the iceberg, so to speak. There are countless bumps on the road that is their relationship. Given how many there are, the odds are good that readers will find themselves resonating with at least one of these events. They’re very human, even when drawn out to certain extremes.

“But it is worth noting that to be good at something is not quite the same as loving it.”

To put it simply, the relationship between Sadie and Sam is the foundation for Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow. Yet it isn’t the only part of this story, as it is a love note to the whole video game history. There are so many hat tips and references. Yet they’re all done with a sense of reverence. They lack the flippant handling that I’ve expected, based on other famous examples of this type of storytelling. It’s the missing piece I hadn’t realized I’d been looking for.

It’s been a while since I read a novel that moved me to tears (not counting the conclusion of the series, as those always get me). It’s been even longer since a story blindsided me with those tears. Yet Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow gets an award for making me cry on multiple occasions. It dug into my soul and forced me to experience every emotion alongside the characters.

What I’m trying to say is that Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow is very much a worthwhile read. Once again, I hope we’ll see a (faithful) adaptation of a book I am in love with. I want to know how this one would look with a big Hollywood budget.

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About Liz (AKA Cat)

I am an avid animal lover, photographer, reader, and much more. While my photography blog is feeling a bit neglected at the moment, the other sites I'm involved in are going strong. ✧I review books, comics, and basically anything else in the literary world over at Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks (of Books). ✧I review comics and books, as well as write content for Word of the Nerd. ✧I review comics for Monkeys Fighting Robots. ✧I write content for Screen Rant and CBR. ✧I write book reviews for The Review Crew.
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2 Responses to Review: Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow by Gabrielle Zevin

  1. This is on my tbr. Awesome review!

    Like

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